50 Women Game Changers in Food: Martha Stewart (Week 4)

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In 2011, Gourmet released their list of the 50 Women Game Changers in Food. I stumbled on this entirely by accident. One week a couple of months ago, I was meal planning, and didn’t have access to my Ina Garten cookbooks. So, I googled the recipe I was looking for and found it on a blog that was making it’s way through the list (she’s number 39… I’m a little disgruntled that Rachael Ray is higher up than she is). I was inspired to do the same. I need to challenge myself more in the kitchen, and I thought this would be an excellent way to do so.  As I’ve been planning for this, I’ve been flipping through cookbooks, checking out websites and buying new equipment, and I’m excited. I’m also really looking forward to learning more about these game changing women, and introducing myself to recipes I’ve never cooked before.

(And since this entire year-long project will be all recipes I’ve never made before, I can’t promise that everything will turn out the way I want it to. But whether a dish is a winner or an epic fail, I’m going to be completely honest about it.)

For week four, we have Martha Stewart. Everyone knows Martha. Some know her for her recipes & crafts… others know her because of her newsworthy time in prison for a white collar felony.

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(And Snoop does have a felony drug conviction from the early 90’s, but I still love this.)

Martha is actually the reason my interest in food went from just watching Food Network, to actually getting in the kitchen & baking. The first real cookbook I ever bought was Martha Stewart Cupcakes in 2009. In May 2008 my college boyfriend broke up with me, and I had a lot of time on my hands. I filled that time with Harry Potter, martini’s at Therapy (RIP), hours & hours at the YMCA, and finishing my last year of college. Once I had graduated, finished Harry Potter, and my BFF had gotten married (so our YMCA time had come to an end), I had even more free time on my hands, so I picked up the cupcake book, and never looked back.

Martha is from a middle class family, and learned to cook & sew from her mother. She graduated from Bernard College in 1962, having double majored in history and architectural history. During this time, she supplemented her scholarship money by modeling.

In 1961 she married Andrew Stewart and they moved to Conneticut. Once they moved to Conneticut, Martha was involved in several different business ventures, including catering companies and gourmet food stores. None of these lasted, due to allegations that she was difficult to work with.

In 1982, she released her first book, Entertaining, which included recipes and photographs from parties she had hosted. She released several more books, and in 1990, her magazine Martha Stewart Living was developed. In 1997, she created a new company: Martha Stewart Omnimedia. This consolidated all of her various brands under one roof, and gave her a greater sense of control. As a result of this new company going public on the New York Stock Exchange, Martha became the first female, self made billionaire in the United States.

In 2003, a lot of people thought that the empire she worked to build was done, with her indictment for securities fraud. She served some time (less than a year) in prison, got out, and made one heck of a comeback. Since getting out of prison, you can find her name on houses, cookware, bakeware, craft supplies, you name it, and her name is probably somewhere on it.

“When I got married and had a child and went to work, my day was all day, all night. You lose your sense of balance. That was in the late ’60s, ’70s, women went to work, they went crazy. They thought the workplace was much more exciting than the home. They thought the family could wait. And you know what? The family can’t wait. And women have now found that out. It all has to do with women, or the homemaker leaving the home and realizing that where they’ve gone is not as fabulous, or as rewarding, or as self-fulfilling as the balance between the workplace and the home place.”

So, Martha. And I bring you a recipe from Martha Stewart Living: Wild Salmon, Asparagus & Shitakes in Parchment (Martha Stewart Living, May 2013)

I know one of my goals for this project is to cook things I don’t have a lot of experience with. And while I do cook salmon about 2-3 times a month, I’ve never cooked anything in a parchment paper pouch before.
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While this recipe was really simple to put together, and clean up was a breeze, I didn’t love it, and neither did Graham, although for different reasons. He doesn’t like lemon, and there is lemon zest in the topping, as well as lemon slices between the salmon & the asparagus. The lemon slices were an addition I made, just because I hated wasting the lemon. I didn’t like the fact that the green onions overpowered every other flavor. Every single bite had a strong, onion flavor, and it was very unappealing.
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While the flavor didn’t blow me away, I really enjoyed the cooking method. The asparagus was perfectly cooked, the mushrooms were tender, and the fish was not overcooked or dry. I didn’t break out the meat thermometer, but I’d say this method & the cooking time resulted in medium doneness.

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And plating it couldn’t have been easier. Once I pulled it from the oven & let it rest for a few minutes, I just cut the excess parchment paper away, and moved this to the plate with a spatula.

Wild Salmon with Asparagus & Shitakes in Parchment
(Original recipe found here.)

Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 8 ounces medium asparagus (about 1/2 bunch), trimmed
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Zest of 1 lemon, and the rest of the lemon thinly sliced
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 4 skinless wild-salmon fillets (5 ounces and 1 inch thick each)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees with racks in upper thirds. Cut four 12-by-17-inch pieces of parchment. Fold each in half crosswise to make a crease, then unfold and lay flat. Toss mushrooms, asparagus, and scallions with oil in a large bowl. Sprinkle with lemon zest and season with salt and pepper.
  2. Remove asparagus from mixture and divide evenly among parchment pieces, creating a bed of spears on 1 side of crease. Top each with 2 lemon slices, 1 piece of fish, then with mushroom mixture. Drizzle each serving with 1 tablespoon water. To close, fold parchment pieces over each serving; make small overlapping pleats to seal the open sides and create 4 half-moon-shaped packets.
  3. Bake packets on baking sheets for 10 minutes. Carefully cut open packets with kitchen shears (steam will be released). Serve fish, asparagus, and mushrooms with lemon wedges for squeezing.

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What I’m Loving Wednesday

Y’all. This is my 500th blog post! Crazy! Many, many years ago when I started posting here, I was just looking for a place to share cool information. I had a “friends-only” Live Journal for the more personal stuff, but I wanted to be able to share recipes, cool photos, stuff I wanted, and anything else my heart desired. Eventually, this replaced the Live Journal. It still exists, but hasn’t been updated in about five years. Anyways. Check out my first ever post, complete with really horrible flip phone photography. I look at that picture and can’t help but laugh (back when I first bought that phone, everyone commented that it took really good photos). Technology, and my baking skills, have come so far since 2009.

Anyways. It’s Wednesday. And I love this stuff.

How freaking cute is this rolling pin? I have a Christmas one that has snowflakes on it, and it produced such a cool effect. Of course, I have no idea what kind of dough I would want to roll tiny cats on to, but I still want it. 33234893a7d7b96bca94ab0facfc47a2 This is Buddy. At least 2-3 times a week, we’ll leave a drink unattended for mere minutes (usually me), and we look over and see him pawing at the ice cubes in it. Not sure why he does this, but it’s annoying and semi-adorable. I know I come off as a crazy cat lady, but he really is awesome and super smart. We see him doing it, yell for him to stop, and before we can get to him, he’ll subtly flick his paw and knock the cup over. I love this print. Not sure where I would hang it, but I love it. dcc748a3d3058a473927c666ee91110aI’ve been wanting a Le Creuset for a while. I’ve had the Martha Stewart one from Macy’s, and I’ve had a Food Network one from Kohls, and neither have held up very well. I got a good bit of money from my mom and my in-laws for Christmas, so I’ve decided to use some of it, and get what I should have gotten in the first place. And I’m in loooooooove with the new matte navy. I saw this when we were in Charleston, and it just about killed me not to buy it on the spot! From my exhaustive internet searching, I’m pretty sure the navy is only available at Williams-Sonoma. I can’t wait for it to get here!
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Y’all know I love mason jars, and these purple ones are my favorite so far! Apparently the colored mason jars from Ball the past three years (first aqua, then green & now purple) have been a part of a limited edition series. Of course I had to finish out the series (much to Graham’s displeasure…). I think the purple are my favorite of all the colors. They’re a little smokier in person than they are in the pictures, but the color is still so, so pretty.
632810eMy favorite game to play with other people (no one likes playing Scrabble or Monopoly with me… I’m a tad bit competitive) is Cards Against Humanity. If you’re not easily offended it is a lot of fun. Some of the cards are pretty horrible, tacky, tasteless, etc. And they give you blank ones in case you come up with something equally horrible. Anyways. There is the game, and then there are a bunch of expansion packs. Once we had all of the expansion packs, I needed something to put them in. Enter the bigger, blacker box. It was $15, but I had to have it. When it came, I just thought it was a cool box and it was serving its purpose of keeping all of my cards in one place. Then, I learned there was a card hidden inside the box, and it was instantly cooler. The card reads “biggest, blackest d*ck” and is printed in silver foil instead of the black ink.

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A lovely weekend.

I love long weekends. I know, I know… I have long weekends every week. But they’re always more fun when Graham is home with me. We kicked off our weekend with a quick dinner at Plaza Azteca, before meeting some friends for a game night. Graham ordered the biggest burrito I’ve ever seen. He had the burrito San Jose, and I had the burrito Mex with steak, black beans & rice on the side. It’s not nearly as good as El Porton or Miguels, but it’s pretty good for a Mexican chain restaurant.
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I volunteered to bring something sweet for game night, so I brought these pineapple upside down cupcakes. Graham ate four of them, so I guess they were pretty good ;)
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The weather has been crappy lately, and since it’s dark at 5:00pm, Hermione hasn’t had a walk in a while. Saturday was a tiny bit chilly, but otherwise it was a beautiful day. So we bundled up and headed to Jamestown with Hermione. There are lots of great places to walk her out there, and we took a trail we had never taken before. It ended up being just under 5 miles and it was lovely.
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Equally wonderful were the donuts we had from Duck Donuts after our walk. If you’ve never been to a Duck Donuts and you have the opportunity, you MUST stop by! Everything is made to order, and so, so delicious. I had a strawberry frosted donut with sprinkles, Graham had a cinnamon bun donut. The hot donut was coated in cinnamon & sugar, and then drizzled with frosting. Both were amazing. These donuts are hot and just melt in your mouth, and they are SO much better than Krispy Kreme & Dunkin’ Donuts.

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On the way home, we stopped by this used book store in Williamsburg. Last week I had dropped off some old Nora Robert’s romance novels and a few cookbooks and ended up with $25 in credit. I dropped off some more books on Saturday and browsed for a minute. I was pretty excited to find both of these! And the best part: I had more than enough credit, so I didn’t have to spend any actual money! 2015-01-17 15.37.35

Saturday night we stayed in, and I made shrimp & grits for dinner. A few weeks ago I ordered $40 worth of grits from Anson Mills, and I was pretty excited to cook with them. They took nearly an hour and a half, but they were so good. They’re cooked like you would make risotto, and they’re a much coarser than what you can find at the grocery store. Instead of the usual asparagus I serve with this, I decided to go extra southern and serve roasted okra. This was such a delicious dinner. 2015-01-17 19.55.31-1

Sunday was rainy & gross, so we decided to stay in & hang pendant lights in the kitchen. This is something we’ve talked about doing many times since we’ve lived here, and I’m so glad we finally decided to do it. We didn’t really know what we wanted, so we went to Home Depot & Lowe’s for inspiration, and I fell in love with these from Lowe’s. They took forever to hang, since Graham had to get creative with the wiring, but they are so, so pretty. We even splurged and bought the Edison style lightbulbs, since the glass is clear. I’m completely in love with them, and I HATE it took us a year and a half to do it. 2015-01-19 08.58.492015-01-19 08.59.022015-01-18 21.20.58-1

And since we were both off Monday, we took advantage of another gorgeous day and took Hermione for another long walk. We took her to First Landing State Park for a nearly 6.5 mile walk. The first bit of the walk, we passed a LOT of people. Once we turned down a side trail, we were completely alone, so Graham let Hermione off of her leash. She went crazy, got filthy, and had so much fun. 2015-01-19 12.13.35-12015-01-19 12.29.44-12015-01-19 12.37.17

Dinner was pretty epic that night as well. Graham had requested broccoli & cheese soup in pretzel bowls, and I was happy to oblige. These bread bowls are so, so good (make them a little smaller and you’d have excellent rolls for burgers) and really easy to make. And the soup was pretty delicious as well. Last time I made these, I thought the bowls were a little small for soup, so I experimented this time. I couldn’t fit all eight on one tray for the second rise, so I made five exactly how the recipe said, and for the last three I made them bigger. I took enough dough for three bowls and made two. They were a much more appropriate size, and I’ll definitely make them that size in the future.
2015-01-19 17.21.282015-01-19 18.42.00-1Hope everyone else had a wonderful weekend!

 

50 Women Game Changers in Food: Fannie Farmer (Week 3)

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In 2011, Gourmet released their list of the 50 Women Game Changers in Food. I stumbled on this entirely by accident. One week a couple of months ago, I was meal planning, and didn’t have access to my Ina Garten cookbooks. So, I googled the recipe I was looking for and found it on a blog that was making its way through the list (she’s number 39… I’m a little disgruntled that Rachael Ray is higher up than she is). I was inspired to do the same. I need to challenge myself more in the kitchen, and I thought this would be an excellent way to do so.  As I’ve been planning for this, I’ve been flipping through cookbooks, checking out websites and buying new equipment, and I’m excited. I’m also really looking forward to learning more about these game changing women, and introducing myself to recipes I’ve never cooked before.

(And since this entire year-long project will be all recipes I’ve never made before, I can’t promise that everything will turn out the way I want it to. But whether a dish is a winner or an epic fail, I’m going to be completely honest about it.)

Number three on the list is Fannie Farmer.

fannie-farmerIf you’ve ever expressed gratitude that you measure something using standardized measurements, you can thank Fannie Farmer. By advocating the use of standard measurements in recipes, she revolutionized the way Americans cooked.

Fannie Farmer (March 23, 1857 – January 15, 1915) was born near Boston, MA in Medford. She suffered a stroke when she was 16, which left her homebound for several years. While her family believed in education for females, her stroke left her unable to finish high school or attend college. When she was 30, she began attending the Boston Cooking School. She did very well, and after completing the program, she became the assistant to the director, and eventually the principal of the school in 1891.

In 1896, she published her most well-known cookbook, The Boston Cooking School Cookbook, which introduced the idea of standard measurements. Farmer provided scientific explanations of the chemical processes that occur in food during cooking, and also helped to standardize the system of measurements used in cooking in the USA. Before the Cookbook’s publication, other American recipes frequently called for amounts such as “a piece of butter the size of an egg” or “a teacup of milk.” Farmer’s systematic discussion of measurement led to her being named “the mother of level measurements.”

In 1902 she left the Boston Cooking School & founded her own program: Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery. She continued to teach, write & lecture (even lecturing on nutrition and illness at Harvard Medical School) until her death in 1915.

Her original cookbook, The Boston Cooking School Cookbook, is actually still in print today. It has been revised many times, most recently by Marion Cunningham. in 1996 to celebrate the books 100th anniversary.

While her original recipes are much easier to read and comprehend, they still are challenging. They lack something that is pretty darned standard in modern recipes: oven temperatures. For example, the scone recipe I’m about to share has the baking time/temperature written as “bake in a hot oven for 15 minutes.” What constitutes a hot oven? 250? 350? 450? Those questions have been answered in the revised copies of her cookbook. I’ll talk more about Marion Cunningham in Week 51, but she did a fantastic job making these recipes accessible for today’s home cooks, and adding a few new recipes of her own. Finding something to make out of the 100th Anniversary edition of the book was challenging. It seemed everything I picked out had been added by Marion Cunningham, and wasn’t original to the book. So, I went back to the digital version of the original and was determined to find something. I have to say… 19th century recipes don’t sound all that appealing, so I finally landed on the bread section. I’ve never made scones before, and this recipe from the 1918 edition seemed easy enough (since it was in the 1918 edition, I have no idea if this was actually her recipe, or something someone else added). I jazzed these up a little bit with some lemon zest, and added a simple lemon glaze to the finished product. The hint of sweetness was perfect, and these were absolutely delicious. The original recipe doesn’t give serving sizes, but the Marion Cunningham edition says it makes 12 wedges. I wanted bigger pieces, so I just went with 8 wedges.

(Side note: used copies of this book are CRAZY cheap on Amazon. I got mine for less than $2, with $3 for shipping. It’s definitely worth picking up a copy for your own kitchen. The recipes are great, but the tips, tricks & helpful information make this book a winner.)

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Lemon Cream Scones

(Original recipe slightly modified from the Fannie Farmer Cookbook)

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons of baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 4 tablespoons of butter; cut into small pieces
  • 2 eggs; well beaten
  • 1/2 cup of heavy cream

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Mix dry ingredients together and cut in the butter, using a pastry cutter or your fingers, until it resembles a coarse meal.
  3. Mix the eggs and the cream into the dry ingredients until well combined. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for another minute.
  4. Cut the dough into wedges (or whatever shape you prefer), and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment or a silpat (you’ll want a small amount of space between each scone).
  5. Bake for 15 minutes.

Serve with butter or jam, or top with a powdered sugar glaze. I made a simple glaze from 1/4 cup of lemon juice (the juice of 2 lemons) and 1 & 1/4 cups of powdered sugar. I brushed the glaze on top of each scone with a pastry brush  and let dry. And I still topped the scones with homemade blueberry-peach jam (which was darned good on these!).

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What I’m Loving Wednesday: Buddy.

Four years ago today , we hauled ass to Little Rock Animal Village with the intention of adopting a cat they had named Jazz. While we knew he was awesome from the second we saw him, I had no idea that he would become the furry love of my life.

I know every cat mom thinks this, but he really is the best cat ever.

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He’s so smart.

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He’s the most affectionate cat in the history of the world.

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He makes the most adorable noises ever.

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He loves all people & all animals.

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He turns into a crazy ninja at the faintest hint of catnip.2014-01-08 14.21.46 HDR-1

He’s taken at least 10 years off of my life this year, thanks to his adventurous spirit, his medical issues (a heart murmur & urinary troubles) and the fact that he is a horrible car passenger.

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He’s obsessed with stealing fresh herbs and carrot peels.

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He loves to “help” when Graham and I are working on a project.

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And I absolutely can not imagine my life without him.

Happy 5th Birthday, Buddy!

 

50 Women Game Changers in Food: Alice Waters (Week 2)

Bake. Create. Love. | Alice Water's Apple Tart

In 2011, Gourmet released their list of the 50 Women Game Changers in Food. I stumbled on this entirely by accident. One week a couple of months ago, I was meal planning, and didn’t have access to my Ina Garten cookbooks. So, I googled the recipe I was looking for and found it on a blog that was making it’s way through the list (she’s number 39… I’m a little disgruntled that Rachael Ray is higher up than she is). I was inspired to do the same. I need to challenge myself more in the kitchen, and I thought this would be an excellent way to do so.  As I’ve been planning for this, I’ve been flipping through cookbooks, checking out websites and buying new equipment, and I’m excited. I’m also really looking forward to learning more about these game changing women, and introducing myself to recipes I’ve never cooked before.

(And since this entire year-long project will be all recipes I’ve never made before, I can’t promise that everything will turn out the way I want it to. But whether a dish is a winner or an epic fail, I’m going to be completely honest about it.)

Number two on the list is Alice Waters.

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I knew nothing about her when I started this, I had actually never even heard of her, but now I’m pretty much obsessed with her, and her book, The Art of Simple Food. Her food philosophy is that that cooking should be based on the finest and freshest seasonal ingredients that are produced sustainably and locally. Over the course of her career, her restaurant, Chez Panisse in Berkeley, has created a community of local farmers and ranchers who are dedicated to providing food through sustainable agriculture. And while I love that, what I love most about her is how her work has positively impacted children in her community, and throughout the United States.

She is one of the creators of the Edible Schoolyard, a one acre pieces of land behind a middle school. Working with the principal, they created the Edible Schoolyard, “which involves students in all aspects of farming the garden and preparing, serving, and eating food as a means of awakening their senses and encouraging awareness and appreciation of the transformative values of nourishment, community, and stewardship of the land.” While this project has its roots in Berkeley, it has spread to various places throughout the country, and there are now Edible Schoolyards in New York, New Orleans, San Francisco and Greensboro, NC.

Bake. Create. Love. | Apple Tart

As much as I love to cook and bake, I have a confession to make: making my own pastry dough freaks me out. I’m always worried that it won’t turn out right, so I just don’t make it. I always make do with a frozen, store bought pie crust. Making this, I learned I had nothing to be scared of. The dough came together really easily, and the flavor and texture were so much better you get with the frozen Pillsbury crust from the grocery store. I learned that dough is pretty forgiving. If it tears, or you roll it out too thin, you can just start over. When I placed the dough in my tart pan, the edge of the pan broke through the dough, so I just pinched it back together. This tart doesn’t look perfect, and that’s part of its charm.

Bake. Create. Love. | Apple Tart

Alice Waters Apple Tart
(Recipe found here.)

Ingredients:
Dough:

  • 1 cup of all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 t. sugar
  • 1/8 t. salt
  • 6 T. unsalted butter, just softened, cut in 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons chilled water

Filling:

  • 2 lbs. of golden delicious apples (for me, it was three large apples)
  • 2 T. of unsalted butter
  • 2-3 T. of sugar

Glaze:

  • Cores & peels from the apples
  • Water
  • 1/2 cup of sugar

Directions:
Dough:

  1. Combine flour, sugar and salt in your mixing bowl.
  2. Add 2 T. of the butter, and mix until dough resembles a coarse cornmeal. Add the rest of the butter and mix until the pieces are the size of lima beans.
  3. Slowly add water until dough has come together, and shape into a ball. Flatten into a 4″ disc, wrap and refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Remove from the fridge and let soften slightly. You want to be able to work with, but still want it to be cold.
  4. Roll into a 14″ circle on a lightly floured surface, and carefully move the dough to your tart pan.

Filling:

  1. Melt the 2 T. of butter & set aside.
  2. Peel, core, and thinly slice apples (you want them about 1/8″ thick). Do not throw away the peels & cores.
  3. Arrange your apple slices in your tart pan, and then fold the dough that is hanging over the edge of your tart pan onto the apples and crimp edges at 1″ intervals.
  4. Brush melted butter over the dough edge and the apples, and sprinkle with the 3 T. of sugar.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes, rotating pan every 15 minutes. You want the edges of the apples to be lightly browned, and the crust to be a lovely golden brown.

Glaze:

  1. Add reserved cores & peels to a sauce pan. Add just enough water to cover them, and add 1/2 cup of sugar. Let simmer on medium-low heat for 25 minutes.
  2. Strain syrup (I used a fine mesh strainer) and throw out the pieces of apple. Add the syrup back to the sauce pan, crank up the heat to high, and let boil for five minutes.

This was absolutely perfect on its own, but it was even better with a dollop of homemade cinnamon whipped cream (1/2 pint of heavy cream, 1/2 cup of powdered sugar, 1 t. of cinnamon – beat cream until stiff peaks form, mix in the powdered sugar & cinnamon). But with whipped cream (or vanilla ice cream…) or without, this is perfection. I love apple pie, but this was so incredible, I don’t know if I’ll ever make one again.

Bake. Create. Love. | Apple Tart

Recipe: Chicken & Wild Rice Soup

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It’s cold outside. If you have any doubts about that, just do a quick scroll through your Facebook or Twitter feeds. I guess I’m the odd ball, but I LOVE winter. I LOVE cold weather. Nothing makes me happier than lighting candles, eating comfort food, and curling up on the couch in a hoodie and pajama pants and watching TV with Graham (especially now that Friends is on Netflix!!!). But, apparently I’m alone in feeling this way. But I can’t complain too much about people complaining about the cold. Because pretty much the minute the temperature goes higher than 70, I start whining about how hot it is.

Anyways. I’ve said it before, but I love soup. I’ll happily eat it when it’s 110 degrees outside, but cold days like these scream for a pot of homemade soup. And I have another good one for you. The only part of this recipe that is complicated? Actually finding wild rice. All I could find at the grocery stores was a wild rice blend (and the ones I’ve seen don’t have nearly enough wild rice), so I settled for this microwaveable pouch of rice I found at Target. It turned out to be the perfect amount of rice for this soup.

Obviously, you can use whatever method you like for obtaining the chicken & the chicken stock, but for me it makes to much sense to make homemade stock. You spend about $5 on a chicken, and have plenty of meat and stock for this recipe, and others. I only used about half of the meat from the chicken I bought, and have used the rest to make delicious, mayo free chicken salad for easy lunches this week. I also still have two mason jars full of delicious homemade stock left, which I’ll use in jambalaya later this week.

So, chicken & wild rice soup. It’s hearty, comforting and absolutely delicious. This made about 6 Graham & Heather sized servings.

Chicken & Wild Rice Soup

Ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups of chicken stock
  • 2 cups of shredded, cooked chicken
  • 1 small white onion; diced
  • 2 cups of cooked wild rice
  • 3 carrots; peeled & chopped
  • 3 stalks of celery; chopped
  • 8 oz. of sliced mushrooms
  • 2 cloves of garlic; minced
  • 2 sprigs of fresh thyme, plus more for a garnish (optional)
  • 1/4 cup of whole milk
  • 2 T. of butter
  • 1 T. of all-purpose flour

Directions:

  1. Heat dutch oven or soup pot over medium heat. Add the butter. When the olive oil is heated, add the onions, carrots & celery and let cook for about 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook1-2 minutes more.
  2. Add the flour to the vegetables and stir to evenly distribute it. Slowly add in the chicken stock, stirring as you add it in.
  3. Add in the chopped chicken, and reduce the heat to low. Let simmer for as long as you like.
  4. Just before serving, remove the thyme sprigs, and add the cooked rice and the milk. Stir to combine, and let the milk heat through, and serve. Garnish with additional thyme if you want to be fancy.

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